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October 2019

The Futures of Shelley's Triumph
Ever since Paul de Man’s "Shelley Disfigured," we have come to see Percy Shelley’s final, unfinished poem, The Triumph of Life, as a symptom of the end of Romanticism and Romanticism as end. If or once things are over, why bother to re-visit the end? This is one of many questions Shelley’s poem compels its readers to ask, which is in turn to ask why we any longer need to re-visit the poem at this a time when so little apparently rests on our doing so. So, as if to prolong the idea of an end (whatever that might be), this volume is comprised of four essays compelled to return to the same poem, as if to read the poem as a crime scene that leaves a barrage of clues, none of them adding up to a crime, but each lingering differently with Shelley as Shelley lingers with life and history and as we linger (or not) with the shadows his future casts (or not) upon our present moment, which seems more than ever beyond our grasp, if it ever was within our ken. Why even bother? But then again, and just in case: if so little and so much is at stake, why not?
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Mary Wollstonecraft Even Now
This volume attests to the continuing relevance of Mary Wollstonecraft to twenty-first century feminist thought. Making connections between Wollstonecraft's efforts to think within and beyond Enlightenment principles of liberal humanism and various significant issues and debates in contemporary culture from the impacts of social media to the impasses in theories (and practices) of social justice, the essays collectively address questions about what counts as feminism(s) now. Mary Wollstonecraft Even Now explores the range of concerns its contributors take up in considering the feminist afterlives of Wollstonecraft’s controversial writings and ideas.
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June 2019

On the 200th Anniversary of Lord Byron's Manfred: Commemorative Essays
In commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Manfred: A Dramatic Poem (1817) and based on original talks given at an international symposium at New York University on April 21, 2017, this special Romantic Circles Praxis volume offers not only a collection of essays that reassesses Lord Byron’s drama from an array of angles but also recent artistic adaptations of the script and an audio recording of a reenacted musical scene from the 1834 London production of Manfred. Among the subjects addressed in these essays are the play’s dramaturgical and staging potential, the curious history of its publication, circulation, and reception, and the authorial intent of a work based on Byron’s scandalous life. The readings also revisit the complexities behind Manfred’s hybrid genre, while expanding the range of cultural influences and source materials that have previously been associated with the play. With Manfred Byron created a work that fused his own celebrity myth with elements from various cultures, faiths, myths, epochs, genres, and traditions. Byron fired the public imagination with a drama that, in pushing well beyond its rootedness in a Swiss landscape and in his own biography, transcends the limits of the personal and the local as an eccentric and eclectic work of global horizons.
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December 2018

The Griffin (1820) and Other Works 1819

by Morris, Thomas D'Arcy

This edition showcases the poetry of Thomas D’Arcy Morris (1792-1835), a significant figure in the Bombay literary scene of the early nineteenth century. It identifies and attributes Morris’s works, originally published anonymously or pseudonymously in contemporary newspapers and periodicals. The central text is the long review / poem The Griffin, accompanied by some related earlier works by Morris, and some contextual correspondence. The edition also includes a list of later anonymous and pseudonymous works by Morris from the Oriental Sporting Magazine (1828-1833).

July 2018

A Description of the Valley of Chamouni, in Savoy 1818

by Glover, Samuel

By the time that Samuel Glover published A Description of the Valley of Chamouni, in Savoy in 1819, Mont Blanc was well established as a place of great scientific importance and as a key attraction for tourists and travellers seeking the mountain sublime. This edition re-situates Glover’s Description in the context of eighteenth-century and romantic-period writing about Chamonix-Mont Blanc and details its connections to Jean-Baptiste Troye’s popular exhibition of relief models of the area and the controversy surrounding the inscriptions left in the registers of various hotels and tourist sites around Chamonix by Percy Bysshe Shelley in July 1816. It also attempts to solve what is now the mystery of who Samuel Glover might have been: hardly any information about him survives, and what few details are available are all connected with Description.

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May 2018

Charlotte Smith Story Map 2018

The British author Charlotte Turner Smith (1749-1806), best known for her acclaimed and innovative Elegiac Sonnets (1784), has a life story as interesting and difficult as her literature was admired and influential. This StoryMap, by Elizabeth A. Dolan and Gillian Andrews, demonstrates the way in which Smith's residential (in)security was related to her dependence on her father and husband, a situation common to eighteenth-century women. The Charlotte Smith Story Map is the first piece of scholarship to integrate information from all the known letters that Smith wrote; those included in Judith Stanton's 2003 Collected Letters of Charlotte Smith, and also all the letters discovered in the last 15 years.

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May 2018

Romanticism and Affect Studies
This volume presents new work by scholars working at the intersection of British Romanticism and affect studies. Each essay takes a different approach to affect and emotion, from a piece on Joanna Baillie’s passion plays, co-written by a literary scholar and a cognitive psychologist, to a piece that utilizes affect theory and rhythmic studies in a reading of William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. This volume does not propose a single definition of “affect,” but all of the essays share the conviction that the kind of interdisciplinary work demanded by affect studies is beneficial to both Romantic studies and affect studies. Much more than a passing trend, affect studies has transformed the study of emotion for a generation of scholars.
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June 2017

The Siege of Gibraltar and Miscellaneous Pieces 1780, 1783

by Upton, Catherine

This electronic edition makes available the works of the mostly unknown late-eighteenth-century poet and teacher Catherine Upton, including The Siege of Gibraltar (1781), an epistolary prose narrative, and Miscellaneous Pieces (1784), a collection of poetry and prose. These two works appear to represent the whole of Upton’s small oeuvre, and they contribute to both the body of Romantic-era women’s poetry and, more specifically, to the body of women’s writing about war.

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June 2017

Romanticism and the Rights of the Negative

This collection thinks the “rights” of the negative against the more common association of the term “rights” with human rights and rights that can be posited. Such rights, despite their seeming liberalism, produce a normative notion of the person which is in the end biopolitical, and moreover, in assuming that rights can always be posited, they assume the primacy of the public sphere. The essays in this collection all resist the current emphasis on the public sphere that has resulted from the absorption of “Romanticism” into the “Nineteenth Century,” and focus instead on Romanticism as a retreat from publication, publicity and consensus. Whether this retreat is absolute negation or a withdrawal that holds something in reserve is a question left open in the spaces between these six essays on Godwin, Charlotte Smith, Coleridge and Goya.

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March 2017

The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six

by Southey, Robert

Based on extensive new archival research, The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six: 1819 to 1821 brings together for the first time Southey’s surviving letters from a period of turbulence and transition in his own life and in wider society. The 546 letters published here are testimony to Southey’s formidable energy and commitment to letter writing as a vehicle for social networking and for the exchange of information and opinion. They show his active engagement in cultural and political debate locally, nationally and internationally. They reflect on a vast range of subjects, including domestic and familial relationships, medicine and science, economics, the law, the history, flora and fauna of the Lake District and of Brazil, attempts to improve the lot of distressed gentlewomen, the need to treat men who acted ‘unlawfully (especially in mobs)’ as wild ‘beasts’, European lotteries, and new inventions such as the ‘German Horse’ (a predecessor of the bicycle).

February 2017

The Prose of Romanticism

Is Romantic prose a neutral instrument of representation? Does it struggle to engage questions of experience and sensation in new ways? How should prose be understood in relation to poetic expressiveness? The essays in this volume explore Romantic prose across multiple genres as a kind of performative utterance that redraws the boundaries between the private and the social.

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December 2016

New Work on German Romanticism
“What’s new with German Romanticism?” – the question gestures to the important contribution of German-language writing to our understanding of the period but also to the trenchant and suggestive interrogation of the category of “newness” by German Romantic writers. The essays in this collection represent some of the most important current trends in scholarship, but each also grapples in some way or another with the challenges that the literary, philosophical, scientific, and legal writings of Romanticism pose to received narratives about history, meaning, and power, including narratives about originality and newness, revolutionary breaks and fresh beginnings.
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English Romanticism in East Asia
This volume brings together essays from Japan, China, Taiwan, and Korea to offer an unprecedented view of English Romanticism’s presence in the modern literature and literary criticism of East Asia. Going beyond simply tracing the influence of English Romantic writing on East Asian writers and critics, each essay reveals an intrinsic and often surprising interconnectedness in the Romantic aesthetics and mode of thought across the borders of East and West. This collection’s reflection on English Romanticism through the historical particularities of East Asian nations at the onset of modernity sheds light on Romanticism as a still valid form of cultural critique against the shared yet divergent forms, experiences, and questions of modernity.
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November 2016

Multi-Media Romanticisms
This volume explores the multiplicity of the media concept during the Romantic age in England. The collection's central investigations include: the multiplicity of Romantic-era media technologies and theories; the conceptual models of network, assemblage, and ecology used by contemporary scholars to map the relations between media; Romantic valorizations of noise as a benign register of materiality, singularity, and finitude; and the turn to questions of affect and emotion as a way to describe the position of the subject within extended networks of mediation. Volume contributors reflect on the interactions among the diverse media forms of the Romantic age and explore the connections between those old media forms and today’s dynamic new media ecologies.

June 2016

The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Five
1816 to 1818

by Southey, Robert

Based on extensive new archival research, The Collected Letters of Robert Southey. Part Five: 1816-1818 publishes for the first time Southey’s surviving letters from a period of considerable upheaval in his own life and in wider society. These were years that saw Southey get to grips with the ambiguities inherent in his role as an ambitious, reforming Poet Laureate, face public controversy and the ghost of his younger, radical self with the illicit publication of Wat Tyler in 1817, and combat private despair over the death of his son. The 537 letters published here are proof that, despite the numerous demands on his time, Southey remained in mid life a vigorous and indefatigable correspondent. They cover a massive variety of subjects – literary and non-literary, public and private, local and global. They shed new light on Southey’s views on literature, politics, religion and society; his work as Poet Laureate and his engagement in public life and public controversy; his relationships with his contemporaries, including Coleridge, Caroline Bowles, Hazlitt, Leigh Hunt, Samuel Rogers, William Wilberforce and Wordsworth; his domestic life in Keswick; his extended family and social networks; his extensive reading; his working practices; his prolific output of poetry and prose; and his interactions with publishers and negotiation of the literary marketplace. The letters show Southey’s career in progress, reveal that it was more complex than has previously been thought, and provide compelling evidence about how his works were shaped and reshaped by external pressures that he could not always control or defeat. They thus make it possible to refine our understanding both of Southey and of the ways in which Romantic writers came to terms with the complex and contentious culture of the mid-late 1810s.

May 2016

Minimal Romanticism
What might romantic minimality and brevity suggest as alternative additions to our critical vocabulary in romantic studies? How do they allow us to think differently—and briefly—about a constellation of questions and perspectives that throw into relief the necessity to think through the small, negligent, obscure, too little or too much, the ephemeral, the mere there is, the all but not there? The authors of the position papers collected for this issue were each asked to respond to just these kinds of prompts, and to keep their arguments operatively brief. Conciseness and intensification in service of our theme of brevity and minimality was the order of the day. The space between stanzas, like the disappearance of a ruin into history, became equal considerations for reflecting on the brevity of things that the larger “life” of romanticism cannot ever ignore.

March 2016

Romantic Systems
The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it is to provide a single theoretical perspective with which to view those authors. Instead, the essays collectively convey a sense that Romantic writers viewed systems with a distinctive mixture of skepticism, anxiety, and enthusiasm.
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November 2015

Percy Shelley and the Delimitation of the Gothic

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on the other, to press the limits of the Gothic down to their most basic foundations, releasing new potentials. These essays all argue in different way that, by the end of his career, Shelley has proposed an answer to the question: what does Gothic writing most basically assume in its mixtures of previous genres, and how do these assumptions both establish its limits and set the stage for transgressing them?

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October 2015

The Politics of Shelley: History, Theory, Form
This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates a potential binary in our understanding of Shelley's "interventionist" work: the "antinomy of commitment and autonomy." Asking what it means for a work of art to intervene in its immediate political context, the present volume asserts the necessity of seeing through and beyond the antinomy of political commitment and artistic autonomy by rereading and reimagining the political in Shelley’s writings and his legacy. Indeed, the essays in this volume chart new political possibilities in our estimation of Shelley’s body of work—pathways that take us back to post-Peterloo repression through to the Victorian Shelleyans, and then forward to Jacques Rancière’s post-Marxism.

September 2015

Reviews & Receptions

The new Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions section is an innovative venture in contemporary Romantic scholarship, comprising short reviews of recent work, live BookChats, BookLists, a forum for debate, and an evolving compendium of appearances of Romanticism in popular culture.

April 2015

Wordsworth's Guide to the Lakes 1810, 1835

by Wordsworth, William

First published in 1810 and then revised over three decades, Wordsworth’s Guide has long been recognized as a crucial text for students of Romantic-era landscape aesthetics, ecology, travel writing, and tourism. The Romantic Circles edition provides access to the rare 1810 text and its images, an extensively annotated and illustrated version of the 1835 text (the last edition revised by Wordsworth), a parallel-text feature that allows readers to track and visualize the evolution of the book across its various editions, excerpts from letters by Wordsworth and his circle that shed light on the work’s genesis and development, an annotated bibliography of previous scholarly editions and criticism on the Guide, and a mapping feature that allows readers to identify and explore virtually the many locations mentioned by Wordsworth. The edition’s introduction offers fresh information on the Guide’s publication and reception history and situates it in the larger context of Lakeland writing and the development of the Lake District as tourist terrain.

February 2015

Romantic Materialities
The six essays collected here suggest that Romanticism exposes us to a materialism that cannot merely be overcome and an idealism with which it is not identical. By reading beyond the texts conventionally associated with Romanticism, and by recasting the critical tendencies–from thing theory to object oriented ontology–through the poets, genres, and critics of Romanticism, these essays position Romanticism (and show how Romanticism may always have been positioned) in another relation to things as they are–or may be.

February 2015

Verses Transcribed for H.T. 1804

by Tighe, Mary

Published here for the first time, Verses Transcribed for H.T. is a manuscript collection of 121 original lyric poems with 72 original illustrations that Mary Tighe prepared in 1805 as she was contemplating publishing a volume of poetry that would feature her epic romance "Psyche; or, the Legend of Love" accompanied by a selection of her lyrics. Instead she opted to print 50 copies of Psyche; or, The Legend of Love (London, 1805) without any additions from Verses in a small private edition that she dedicated and distributed to family and friends (her only publication). After she died her family published Psyche, with Other Poems (London, 1811), which offered a carefully culled and re-ordered selection of 29 lyrics from Verses (with 10 additional lyrics).

Verses Transcribed for H.T. provides a truly unique opportunity to see Tighe as the determining editor of her own collected poems. Organized in deliberate clusters, Verses is a self-consciously constructed aesthetic artifact that radically revises prior knowledge of Tighe's literary, visual, and material production: 65 of the 121 poems had not appeared in any known print sources as of yet; 17 of the 121 poems contain significant variants from the published versions; at least 15 of the poems are written in the voice of characters from Tighe's 1803 manuscript novel Selena, versus the 11 that are printed in the novel; dozens attest to Tighe's full-scale engagement with contemporary poetics and politics: the discourse of sensibility, Della Cruscan poetry, coterie culture, the sonnet revival, Romantic antiquarianism, the 1794 Treason Trials, the 1798 Irish Rebellion, the 1801 Act of Union, and more.

This edition contains a comprehensive introduction by the editor, a fully annotated and searchable transcription of the manuscript, and digital images of the manuscript pages, made available through the kind courtesy of the National Library of Ireland.

December 2014

Visuality's Romantic Genealogies
This volume is dedicated to both excavating the Romantic genealogies of visuality and charting directions for the ways in which the study of Romantic visual culture may redraw the geographic, temporal, and disciplinary bounds of Romanticism, bringing diverse, and in some instances new, objects and their ethical, political, and aesthetic stakes into view. The essays investigate three broad inquiries: 1) technologies of vision and objectivity’s slippages; 2) the indigenous or transplanted fruits of visuality’s New World Genealogies and 3) the role of proto-photography, panopticism, and slavery in the spectral formation of Romantic visuality. Emphasizing the ways we interpret visuality in romantic culture, the volume invites reconsideration of media, practices, and discourses that would seem to belong to earlier and later periods—from the artifacts and modes of viewing attached to curiosity and to technologies and ways of imaging and imagining that have become aligned with photography and the digital. The volume includes an editor's introduction by Theresa M. Kelley and Jill H. Casid, with essays by Sophie Thomas, Marcus Wood, Matthew Francis Rarey, Kay Dian Kriz, and Lucy Kamiko Hawkinson Traverse.

October 2014

Tragedy, Translation and Theory: In Honor of Thomas J. McCall
This issue takes its inspiration from the writings on translation, tragedy and twentieth-century literary theory in the work of the late Romanticist and comparatist Tom McCall, who died suddenly in January 2011. Three noted Romanticists and literary theorists, taking off from specific critical essays by McCall, explore the centrality of Greek tragedy as it emerges in Romantic writing (especially that of Friedrich Hölderlin), for philosophy, literature, and literary theory. Passing between the Greek and the German (notably in Hölderlin’s translations of Sophocles), and between the literary and the philosophical, these papers offer new and original insights into the complex ways in which Romantic writing was bound to the translation and interpretation of Greek writing and the unique manner in which twentienth-century literary theory emerged from the Romantic reflection on the relation between language and the emergence (and suspension) of thought. Edited and introduced by Cathy Caruth, with essays by Cathy Caruth, Ian Balfour, David S. Ferris, and three contributions from Tom McCall (1 |2 |3).
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August 2014

An Uninteresting Detail of a Journey to Rome
1787 to 1789

by Flaxman, Ann

Ann Flaxman's An Uninteresting Detail of a Journey to Rome tells the story of a female Grand Tour, something quite rare, and of an extended artist's visit to Italy, something quite common. In 1787 Flaxman set out for France and Italy with her husband, the sculptor John Flaxman, and a small company of fellow travellers. During her journey and in the months that followed her arrival in Rome, Flaxman kept a perceptive and entertaining journal for the benefit of friends at home, a group that included William and Catherine Blake. Personal yet nonetheless typical of its genre, Flaxman's previously unpublished Journey serves as an excellent introduction to English travel writing just before the French Revolution, and to the late-eighteenth-century international arts scene. It also reveals the challenges and rewards of being an atypically poor traveller and an aspiring woman writer.

July 2014

Stanley Cavell and the Event of Romanticism
The American philosopher Stanley Cavell arrives at the striking conclusion that “romanticism opens with the discovery of the problem of other minds, or with the discovery that the other is a problem, an opening of philosophy.” Cavell’s account of how Romanticism opens is not historical in orientation, but rather offers a rich conceptual, aesthetic, and ethical site of concern that both interrupts and generates his life’s work—thus presenting an opening for scholars and students of the Romantic period to think the subject of Romanticism anew in studying (with) Cavell. The present collection—with essays (in suggested reading order) by Emily Sun, Paul Fry, Eric Lindstrom, Eric Walker, and Anne-Lise François, and a substantial Afterword by Joshua Wilner—hinges between the efforts to record Cavell’s engagement with British Romantic texts and to stage new interventions.
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July 2014

Fables Ancient and Modern, by Edward Baldwin, Esq. 1804, 1806

by Godwin, William

This is the first installment of a complete critical edition of Godwin’s ten contributions to his Juvenile Library. It makes available for the first time since 1824 the first text that Godwin both authored and published under his own imprint, Fables Ancient and Modern. Adapted for the Use of Children from Three to Eight Years of Age (1805), along with a comprehensive introduction and extensive notes by the editors. While literary historians have long been aware that radical author William Godwin wrote and published children's books, these works are substantially less visible than his novels and philosophical writings. Yet, the profound cultural impact of Godwin's children's literature—especially as an expression of his social politics—necessitates their reproduction and welcomes further critical inquiry.

June 2014

Romantic Antiquarianism
Featuring essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism, this volume sheds new light on Romanticism's material and visual cultures. Romantic Antiquarianism reveals the important role that antiquarian discourses and practices played in shaping neoclassicism, the sublime, and other major concepts of the Romantic period. Edited and introduced by Noah Heringman and Crystal B. Lake, with essays by Martin Myrone, Jonathan Sachs, Thora Brylowe, Rosemary Hill, Timothy Campbell, Ina Ferris, & Sam Smiles, and a response by Jonah Siegel.

April 2014

An Island in the Moon 1784

by Blake, William

An Island in the Moon is an incomplete manuscript written in pen and ink in Blake’s hand. It contains the earliest extant drafts of "Nurse’s Song," "Holy Thursday," and "The Little Boy Lost," which make their first published appearance in his Songs of Innocence (1789). Topical allusions and the history of Blake’s associations with the London social circle of the Rev. A. S. Mathew and his wife Harriet in the 1780s suggest a period of composition c. 1784-85. The use of dialogue interspersed with song lyrics links the narrative to both contemporary theatrical forms and broader eighteenth-century satirical traditions. Blake and his brother Robert play central roles as the philosophers “Quid” and “Suction.” Although Blake left it orphaned, untitled, and unfinished in a heavily revised manuscript, Island is in some sense a primary literary experiment for him, setting the undertone of much to follow.
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January 2014

An Interview with Anne Mellor
In the interview that comprises this volume, Anne Mellor recounts her determined commitment to rethinking Romanticism through the lens of gender. On the eve of retirement, Mellor continues to query our assumptions and preoccupations as Romanticists, even as she looks back on her long career. The audio clips attached to the transcription resonate with Mellor’s intellectual curiosity, as her voice continues to prompt the reader to return to the texts, the archives, and the critical concerns of Feminist Romanticism. Roxanne Eberle introduces the volume and conducts the interview.
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August 2013

The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Three
1804 to 1809

by Southey, Robert

Part Three is the first-ever collected edition of the surviving letters written by Southey between 1804 and 1809. The letters published here begin with Southey writing to his brother with a draft of his epic poem Madoc; they end on New Year’s Eve 1809, with him discussing Coleridge’s The Friend and his own new writing in the Quarterly Review and The Curse of Kehama (published in 1810). The years 1804–1809 saw the consolidation of important relationships and correspondences, notably with the statistician John Rickman, the translator William Taylor, and the writer Mary Barker. New correspondences of lasting significance were begun: with Neville White, brother of Henry Kirke White, leading to Southey’s editing of Henry’s Remains; with Matilda Betham, who would paint Southey’s and his family’s portraits in London and Keswick; with Anna Seward, who would support his poetry in the press and to whom he would make an hilarious visit; with Walter Savage Landor, whose enthusiasm for his poetry inspired him to return to writing verse in The Curse of Kehama and Roderick, the Last of the Goths (1814); with Walter Scott, whose good offices led Southey to a new career writing for the Quarterly Review and the Edinburgh Annual Register, and to the Laureateship.
The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Four
1810 to 1815

by Southey, Robert

Part Four, covering the period 1810-1815, was a crucial one for Southey’s career and reputation. It has, however, never before been fully documented or fully understood. By 1810 he was established in Keswick – a Lake Poet by residence if not by inclination and one whose interests and connections engaged him in global networks and exchanges. The years 1810-1815 were exceptionally busy ones for Southey. His output was, even by his own standards, prodigious and diverse, encompassing history, reviews, biography, polemics and chronicles of contemporary events. A productive time for Southey the prose writer, the period also saw the revitalisation of his poetic career with the publication of two long poems (The Curse of Kehama in 1810 and Roderick, the Last of the Goths in 1814), new editions of earlier works and plans for new verses aplenty.

A distinctive feature of Southey’s shorter poems from this time is a move towards and investment in the contemporary. It was a move prompted by his controversial decision, in November 1813, to accept the Poet Laureateship. The letters we publish here make it possible for the first time to chart how and why that decision was made, how the resulting disputes were ignited, and how Southey responded to them. In so doing, they show how Southey’s high hopes for the Laureateship foundered on the rocks of reality and thus provide new insights into the vexatious relationship between Romantic poets and the public sphere.

Note: With the publication of Parts 3 and 4, Technical Editor Dr. Laura Mandell has added indexes that allow finding all letters by names of addresees, names of people mentioned in them, and names of places mentioned in them. Visit the Correspondents, Biographies, and Places files to see these indexes at work. A dynamic graphing tool called "Relate" indicates relationships among members of the Southey Circle, and an article by Mandell and Pratt describing how to use that tool will be available in the next few days at Digital Studies / Le Champ Numérique, a special issue concerning data visualization.

April 2013

Romantic Numbers
The six essays in this volume offer a range of mediations prompted by the volume’s title. This volume explores older and newer logics of “matching” and “counting” and “measuring” (whether statistical, geometric, or otherwise un/calculable); they register as well an upsurge in interest in formal-language, neurocognitive and medial-historical approaches. These essays invite us to think “bodies,” “multitudes,” and “subjectivity” along different axes. They ask us to think about the (romantic) one, the (romantic) proper name, quantity, and quality; they invite us to reflect on the status of poetry and measure, about the work of the novel as totalization, about models of mind, about calculuses of populations and food. Ranging through Wordsworth, Scott, Malthus, Babbage, and Galt (among others), this volume points to new directions in romanticist thinking while reconstructing the complexity of romantic-period thought. Edited and introduced by Maureen N. McLane, with essays by Matthew F. Wickman, Marjorie Levinson, James Brooke-Smith, John Savarese, Bo Earle, and Ron Broglio, along with two responses by Maureen N. McLane: Response #1, Response #2.
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March 2013

Nobody: A Comedy in Two Acts 1794

by Robinson, Mary Darby

This electronic edition of Mary Robinson’s Nobody (Drury Lane, 1794), based on the only surviving manuscript of the play (LA 1046) housed in the Larpent collection at the Henry E. Huntington Library, is the first to present a widely-available and searchable transcript of the play along with a comprehensive introduction, extensive notes by the editor, and contexts of the drama, including contemporary commentaries, poems, puffs, and reviews, an account of the public reaction to the play from the Memoirs of the Late Mrs. Robinson (1801), and relevant excerpts from Mary Robinson’s 'Present State of the Manners, Society, &c. &c. of the Metropolis of England' (1800) and James Boaden’s The Life of Mrs. Jordan (1831).
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December 2012

Romanticism and Biopolitics
This collection of articles is intended to initiate a conversation about and between biopolitics and romanticism. Its broad contention is that the study of biopolitics reanimates the question of romanticism in two senses. First, the set of conceptual resources provided in recent work on biopolitics opens up inventive lines of inquiry that enable scholars to re-think the already established awareness that the literature, philosophy, and culture of romanticism displays an obsession with life. In another sense biopolitics reanimates romanticism insofar as the current scholarly concern with life as an object of power marks the radical survival of romanticism. If romanticism responds well when examined in the light of contemporary biopolitical theory, then a constitutive part of this response is a certain resistance to biopolitical theory. The contributors to this volume demonstrate that the biopolitical intervention on life engages paradoxes, predicaments, and aporias that have been widely or fully appreciated neither by theorists of biopolitics nor by critics who take up their work. Romanticism, we suggest, is a privileged locus for the awareness that even the most assured representation of life turns upon an irreducible “literariness.” Edited and introduced by Alastair Hunt and Matthias Rudolf, with essays by Marc Redfield, Emily Sun, and Sara Guyer, along with a response by Eva Geulen.

October 2012

The Gipsy Prince 1801

by Moore, Thomas

Published here for the first time, The Gipsy Prince (Haymarket, 24 July 1801), was the collaboration of Thomas Moore who composed the libretto and lyrics and Michael Kelly who provided the musical score. Though it had the second longest run of Haymarket's summer season, the censoring authorities had not recognized the ploy of introducing the Irish under English rule as Gipsies during the Spanish Inquisition. Although the play could not be revived the following season, publisher John Roach supported Moore by publishing the hoaxing "source," a prose narrative from which Moore pretended to have derived his play. With an introduction by Frederick Burwick, this edition includes his transcription of the previously unpublished manuscript, the prose narrative ostensibly translated from the Spanish, the sheet music as published by Michael Kelly, recordings of the overture and songs as performed under the musical direction of Stephen Pu, and a variorum of the lyrics to facilitate side-by-side comparisons of all versions of the songs. The edition also provides page-by-page images of the original materials.
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Blake in a Post-Secular Era: Early Prophecies
Originally intended to introduce a study of William Blake’s later prophecies, the late Karl Kroeber’s Blake in a Post-Secular Era: Early Prophecies is an accessible and astute survey of the prophetic work that Blake executed between 1788 and 1794. For Kroeber (1926-2009), former Mellon Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University, the post-secular era we are now entering should be prepared to recognize Blake’s centrality in academic literary humanism, which—in its secular phase—excluded Blake on account of his radical Christianity. Such exclusion, Kroeber points out, has not diminished Blake’s immense—and still growing—impact on popular culture, on our music, fiction, film, and graphic novels, as well as on our ideas of creativity, spirituality, and individuality. In stark contrast to the idea of a “universal heart” and to the ideal rational societies envisioned by other Romantic writers, Blake argued that each individual was unique and that only complex social structures based, not on reason, but on the imagination, like Golgonooza, the City of Art, can realize and sustain the individual’s innate divinity.
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Draft Variants from the Bodleian Shelley Manuscripts and the New Edition of Laon and Cythna in The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volume III
This article serves as an online supplement to Laon and Cythna as edited by Michael J. Neth in Volume III of The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley. It contains a record of every known draft variant of the poem, from surviving first draft through intermediate stages to surviving press copy, with the exception of stray letters and marks. The italicized editorial apparatus gives a description of the context of each line and will help textually-inclined readers with access to the published facsimile transcriptions listed locate any passage they wish to examine in greater depth.
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August 2012

John Thelwall in Performance: The Fairy of the Lake
This resource documents the first full production of a John Thelwall play. It contains an introductory essay by Judith Thompson and a full performance video of the 2009 Dalhousie/Zuppa Theatre production of Thelwall’s 1801 “dramatic romance,” as well as a series of series of short video documentaries by student filmmaker Brooke Fifield, exploring the creative challenges, practical considerations and unexpected delights involved in bringing a long-neglected piece of radical Romantic theatre from dusty page to modern stage.
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John Thelwall in Time and Text
In the absence of a full biography, this resource fulfills an urgent need to gather, collate, and circulate existing biographical and bibliographical information on the notoriously under-documented career of Romantic polymath John Thelwall in an accessible location and format. This chronology and bibliography charts what is thus far known about Thelwall’s residences and travels, his chief activities, his writings and lectures, and his correspondence, along with related events, and locations where primary texts can be found.
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July 2012

Robert Southey and Millenarianism: Documents Concerning the Prophetic Movements of the Romantic Era

by Southey, Robert

This edition presents the first scholarly edition of Robert Southey’s various writings about the prophetic movements of Romantic-era Britain. Its aim is to throw new light on two related areas: the nature and history of millenarian prophecy in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries—especially William Bryan, Richard Brothers, and Joanna Southcott—, and the significance of prophecy in Southey’s social, political analysis of his times. A fascinated commentator upon what he termed ‘enthusiasm’, Southey published two of the earliest accounts of Southcott and her predecessors ever written, accounts derived both from personal acquaintance with some of the major figures involved and from a detailed study of their writings. These accounts are reproduced here, collated with the manuscripts on which they were based, and with explanatory notes. In addition, a selection of Southey’s remarks on millenarians in his private manuscript correspondence is presented, and an introduction comprising a brief history of the prophetic movements in the Romantic era and a critical discussion of Southey’s writings on the subject.
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The Banks of Wye 1810, 1812, 1822

by Bloomfield, Robert

An edition of Robert Bloomfield's multimedia picturesque tour of the Wye valley. Poem, tour journal, sketchbook. This edition presents a rare surviving example of the kind of multimedia production that arose from one of the new cultural activities of the late eighteenth century—the picturesque and antiquarian tour. It comprises a facsimile of the manuscript sketch- and scrap-book that Robert Bloomfield made after his 1807 tour of the Wye, an annotated transcription of the prose tour-journal that he incorporated into his scrap book, and a collated and annotated text of the poetic versions of the tour that were published (as The Banks of Wye) in 1811, 1813, and 1823. Also included are reproductions of the engravings that illustrated the 1811 and 1813 publications, deleted or unadopted passages from the manuscript of the poem, and a selection of reviews from journals of the time.
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March 2012

Norse Romanticism
This edition collects twenty-one British writers from c. 1760–1830, a period which is today associated with the rise of Romantic sensibilities. A number of literary works in Britain were inspired by Old Norse manuscripts, collections of Danish folklore or similar such texts from Scandinavia. This electronic edition is a selection of these by canonical authors (such as Thomas Gray, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Robert Southey, Walter Scott, and Ann Radcliffe), as well as selections by lesser known writers, whose texts have not previously been available to modern readers. This edition provides the contextual framework and necessary commentary to explain the ways in which these writers repurpose Norse material.
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February 2012

Romanticism, Forgery and the Credit Crunch
The aim of this volume is to explore the Romantic credit crisis of 1797-1821. The decision to end cash payments and flood the economy with low denominational banknotes led to a spectacular increase in executions for banknote forgery. Many Romantic writers saw this bloody debacle as a sensational illustration of the dangers of an economic system based on mere "paper" value. While some critical attention has been given to the cultural history of credit (Brantlinger, Poovey), the issue of forgery has been overlooked. Yet, as the essays in this volume show, the impact of the credit crisis and its thousands of victims affected literature, journalism and art in often profound ways. Ian Haywood edits and contributes to the volume, along with Robert Miles, Alex Benchimol, Alex J. Dick, and Nick Groom.
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January 2012

Romanticism and Disaster
Romanticism and Disaster considers and responds to the timely concept of devastated life by thinking about how the capacity to read, interpret, and absorb disaster necessitates significant changes in theory, ethics, and common life. What if the consequences or "experience" of a disaster were less about psychic survival than an unblinking desire to face down the disaster as a challenge to normative structures? The essays in this volume attend to the rhetorical, epistemological, political, and social effects of romantic critique, and reflect on how processes of destruction and reconstitution, ruination and survival, are part and parcel of romanticism's grappling with a negativity that haunts its corners. Put in this way, "disaster" does not signal a referential event, but rather an undoing of certain apparently prior categories of dwelling, and forces us to contemplate living otherwise. In confronting the end of things, what are the conditions or possibilities of existence amidst catastrophe? What is a crisis, and what kinds of challenges does it occasion? What can be philosophically gained or lost by analyzing disaster in its multiple sites, contexts, and instances? This volume is edited and introduced by Jacques Khalip and David Collings, with essays by Scott J. Juengel, William Keach, Timothy Morton, and Rei Terada.
Robert Bloomfield: The Inestimable Blessing of Letters
Robert Bloomfield's letters document one artist’s struggles (and sometimes his victories) to share his unique voice and vision; the online publication of his extant letters (a companion to this collection of essays) reveals new and exciting insights into Bloomfield the artist and the man. The essays included in this collection highlight and draw attention to aspects of Bloomfield's literary production that would likely not be possible without the full access to his letters that the edition provides, and make a strong case for why Bloomfield continues to be worthy of study. They suggest how much more remains to be said about this prolific poet. This volume is edited and introduced by John Goodridge and Bridget Keegan, with essays by Tim Fulford, Peter Denney, Ian Haywood, and Bridget Keegan.

October 2011

Circulations: Romanticism and the Black Atlantic
This Romantic Circles Praxis Volume moves the perspective of critical inquiry into British Romanticism from the Island (England) to the Islands (West Indies), considering the particular significance of the Atlantic—watery vortex of myriad economic and cultural exchanges, roaring multiplicity of agencies, and vast whirlpool of creative powers. Black Romanticism remembers a forgotten ancestry of British culture, recovering the vital agencies of diasporic Africans and creole cultures of the West Indies. It does so by practicing counter-literacy, reading the works of nation, empire, and colony against themselves to liberate the common cultures they occlude. The five essays presented here examine texts by or about Jean Jacque Dessalines, Juan Manzano, Jack Mansong, Mary Prince, and John Gabriel Stedman, following a circuitous route that begins in Africa and travels from Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, Suriname, Bermuda, and Antigua to corresponding points in England, America, and the continent. The circulation of radically different adaptations of the “same” material provides new ways to understand the colonial Caribbean. This volume is edited and introduced by Paul Youngquist and Frances Botkin, with essays by Lindsay J. Twa, Lissette Lopez Szwydky, Joselyn Almeida, Dustin Kennedy, and Michele Speitz.

September 2011

Romantic Frictions
The essays in Romantic Frictions find in Romanticism what philosophical modernity has often found there: a disposition to recognize oppositions that cannot be squared or resolved precisely because they constitute the ongoing work of culture and writing. Such frictions are embedded in a shifting temporal moment whose inner complexity is similarly textured such that neither history nor philosophy assumes a master (and fictional) disguise. Both are instead crosscut and assembled in ways that sustain an inner friction that invites being read. Rather than reify the critical tendency, stubbornly at issue since the 1980s, to suppose that Romanticism belongs either to deconstructive philosophy or to new historicism, the essays in this volume understand romanticism as a cultural and literary terrain where these and other disciplinary affiliations exist together, not as easy companions but as productive antagonists. This volume is edited and introduced by Theresa M. Kelley, with essays by Ian Duncan, Mary A. Favret, Daniel O'Quinn, Matthew Rowlinson, Colin Jager, and Jacques Khalip.
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John Thelwall: Critical Reassessments
Capitalizing on the conjunction of renewed scholarly interest in Thelwall and new archival finds, this collection of essays addresses the central question of the coherence and continuity of Thelwall's diverse pursuits—literary, political, scientific, therapeutic, elocutionary, and journalistic—across the four decades of his career (c. 1790-1830), and provides new insight into Thelwall's eclipse and persistence in the nineteenth century. The volume includes an introduction by Yasmin Solomonescu and essays by Nicholas Roe, Mary Fairclough, Molly Desjardins, Emily Stanback, Steve Poole, Angela Esterhammer, and Patty O'Boyle.
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August 2011

The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Two
1798 to 1803

by Southey, Robert

Robert Southey was one of the best-known, controversial and innovative writers in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. Based upon extensive new archival research, this Collected edition makes available for the first time all his surviving letters, freshly edited, annotated and introduced. Part Two covers 1798-1803, a turbulent and crucial time for Southey. It encompasses his public and private responses to Lyrical Ballads (1798); his reaction to the rise of Napoleon and the continuing conflict between Britain and revolutionary France; his second and final visit to Portugal and the resultant hardening of his anti-Catholicism; his unhappy stint as a secretary to the Irish Chancellor Isaac Corry, and his emotional bludgeoning by the deaths in relentless succession between 1801-1803 of three Margarets, his cousin, mother and first child.

April 2011

Romantic Fandom
Romantic-era fans collected autographs, souvenirs, portraits and relics of celebrity writers, artists, performers and athletes; pored over gossip-filled periodicals and newspaper notices; imitated celebrities' fashion statements; fantasized about becoming friends or lovers with celebrities; got caught up in "crazes" for persons and texts; created fan fiction, wrote fan mail and formed communities of like-minded devotees. Analyzing fan practices across a range of cultural contexts, the essays in this volume will explore how the concept of "fandom" can help us make sense of the role of various audiences in the cultural activity and cultural productions of the Romantic period. The volume includes an introduction by Eric Eisner and essays by Nicola J. Watson, Clara Tuite, Mark Schoenfield, and David A. Brewer.
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October 2010

Thoughts in Prison 1776

by Dodd, William

Romantic Circles is pleased to announce the publication of William Dodd's long poem Thoughts in Prison (1777). Written while he was awaiting execution for forgery in his Newgate prison cell, the poem is unique among prison writings and in the history of English literature: none of the many reflections, stories, essays, ballads, and broadside "Confessions" originating—or purporting to have originated—in a jail cell over the last few hundred years can begin to match it in length, in the irony of its author's notoriety, or in the completeness of its erasure from history after a meteoric career in print that began to wane only at the turn of the nineteenth century.

An appendix presents manuscript versions of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "This Lime-Tree Bower, my Prison," by way of suggesting a reliance, at least metaphorically, on this major work of prison literature by Romantic writers.
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September 2010

Editing And Reading Blake
This volume looks at the profound challenges William Blake poses to both editors and readers. Despite the promises of the current multi-modal environment, the effort to represent Blake's works as he intended them to be read is increasingly being recognized as an editorial fantasy. All editorial work necessitates mediation and misrepresentation. Yet editorial work also illuminates much in Blake's corpus, and more remains to be done. The essays in this volume grapple with past, present, and future attempts at editing Blake's idiosyncratic verbal and visual work for a wide variety of audiences who will read Blake using numerous forms of media. This volume is edited by Wayne C. Ripley and Justin Van Kleeck. It includes an editor's introduction by Wayne C. Ripley, with essays by David Fuller, W. H. Stevenson, Mary Lynn Johnson, Rachel Lee and J. Alexandra McGhee, Justin Van Kleeck, and Wayne C. Ripley.

August 2010

The Sublime and Education
This volume offers a series of essays in which contributors meditate on how the concept of education intersects with sublime theory and Romantic aesthetics more generally. Broadly speaking, this volume produces a set of revisionary readings rooted in the critical philosophy of Immanuel Kant and its place in our ongoing understanding of Romantic aesthetics and sublime theory. An underlying inspiration of this volume is the pedagogical theory of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, who has thought widely about humanities-based training using Romantic-era texts as principal theoretical and literary tools, formative among them the aesthetic philosophy of Kant. This volume is edited and introduced by J. Jennifer Jones, with essays by Christopher Braider, Frances Ferguson, Paul Hamilton, Anne C. McCarthy, Forest Pyle, Deborah Elise White, and an afterword by Ian Balfour.
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September 2009

The Letters of Robert Bloomfield and His Circle

by Bloomfield, Robert

This edition builds upon new scholarship on Romantic rural poet Robert Bloomfield, collecting all his extant letters plus a selection of those written to him by literary correspondents, with the hope that by presenting a properly edited and annotated collected letters we might enable the poet to be a significant figure for all those studying early nineteenth-century literature and culture.

May 2009

Frankenstein 1817, 1830

by Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary

This edition of Frankenstein, in gestation for over fifteen years, provides the texts of both the 1818 and 1831 editions, as well as copious annotations that emphasize the novel's strong inter- and intra-textual connections.
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March 2009

The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part One
1791 to 1797

by Southey, Robert

Robert Southey was one of the best-known, controversial and innovative writers in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. Based upon extensive new archival research, this Collected edition makes available for the first time all his surviving letters, freshly edited, annotated and introduced. Part One covers 1791-1797, turbulent years which saw the forging of Southey's career and reputation, his involvement in radical politics, and the beginning of his friendships with Wordsworth and Coleridge.
Edited By:
The Collected Letters of Robert Southey
Robert Southey was one of the best-known, controversial and innovative writers in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. Based upon extensive new archival research, this Collected edition makes available for the first time all his surviving letters, freshly edited, annotated and introduced.

December 2008

Romantic Psyche and Psychoanalysis
This volume offers a series of shifting perspectives on the emergence of psychoanalysis and a psychoanalytical consciousness in early and later British and German Romantic poetry, fiction, philosophy, and science. Rather than read psychoanalysis as one of Romanticism's inevitable outcomes, this volume reads for what remains unthought between Romantic thought and contemporary theory and criticism about Romanticism and psychoanalysis. The papers herein map versions of a psychoanalysis avant la lettre, but more crucially these essays imagine how psychoanalysis before Freud thinks itself differently, as well as anticipating and staging its later concerns, theorizations, and institutionalizations. Together they offer what might be called the profoundly psychosomatic matrix within which the specters of modern subjectivity materialize themselves. This volume is edited and introduced by Joel Faflak, with essays by Matt ffytche, Ildiko Csengei, Julie Carlson, Mary Jacobus, Ross Woodman, and Tilottama Rajan.
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August 2008

Secularism, Cosmopolitanism, and Romanticism
This volume begins to unpack the relationships among the three terms of its title. Despite its air of neutrality, "secularism" is increasingly understood to have its own interests, particularly when it comes to defining and managing the "religious." And, thanks to its constitutive relationship to modernity, romanticism is invested in secularism, not least in those moments typically coded as "spiritual" or "religious." Cosmopolitanism, too, bears a vexed relationship to a period typically associated with nationalism. Finally, secularism and cosmopolitanism are themselves related in surprising ways, both historically and conceptually. Do they pursue the same project? Do they diverge? How and when? And how does romantic writing figure such alignments? These are the questions motivating the three essays in this volume. This volume is edited and introduced by Colin Jager, with essays by Mark Canuel, Colin Jager, Paul Hamilton, and an afterword by Bruce Robbins.
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July 2008

Utopianism and Joanna Baillie
This volume contextualizes work by and work about Joanna Baillie with respect to revisionist thinking about utopianism. Since utopianism has become a positively valued concept within sociological, legal, and other fields, its implications for an understanding of Baillie's approach to social change/social problems, as well as for an understanding of scholarship recovering Baillie for contemporary purposes, deserve to be explored. This volume is edited and introduced by Regina Hewitt, with essays by Thomas McLean, Robert C. Hale, William D. Brewer, Marjean D. Purinton, and Regina Hewitt.
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July 2008

A Chronological Listing of the Letters of Joanna Baillie

by Baillie, Joanna

This chronology orders all known Baillie letters and provides more accurate dates and identifications for many of the previously published letters. By providing watermarks, the place of writing, and the correspondents' names, the chronology also gives a new vantage point from which to view Baillie's life and times. It is published in conjunction with the Romantic Circles Praxis volume Utopianism and Joanna Baillie, edited by Regina Hewitt, to which Thomas McLean contributed an essay explaining this chronological listing.
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June 2008

Philosophy and Culture
This volume addresses a perceived opposition between philosophy and critical theory on the one hand, and culture or cultural studies on the other. It seeks to revalidate critical work that develops a philosophy of culture and a culturally historical philosophy. This volume is edited and introduced by Rei Terada, with essays by Manu Chander, Ted Underwood, Thomas Pfau, J. Hillis Miller, and Daniel Tiffany.
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April 2008

Romantic Circles Bibliography
Intended to help Romanticists keep informed about recent publications in the field, this resource offers the Tables of Contents to recent editions of selected Romantics journals, and offers an annual listing of books that are likely to be of interest to students of Romanticism.
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April 2008

“Soundings of Things Done”: The Poetry and Poetics of Sound in the Romantic Ear and Era
This forum attends to the sounding sense of Romantic poetry, both thematically (a poetics of sound) and sensually/phonically (the poetry of sound and the sound of poetry). This volume is edited and introduced by Susan J. Wolfson, with essays by Susan J. Wolfson, James Chandler, Garrett Stewart, and Adam Potkay.
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March 2008

The Fall of Robespierre 1794

by Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, Southey, Robert

This edition provides an annotated text of the play, supplemented by a wide range of literary and journalistic materials that offer contexts in which to understand the work's place in relation to the authors' politics, the transmission and reception of news, and the role of Robespierre within English political culture.
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January 2008

Romanticism and the New Deleuze
This volume summarizes and utilizes the arc of Gilles Deleuze's work while turning it towards Romantic writers, providing a thoughtful intervention in Romantic criticism, opening up new terrain on travel, the sublime, and the revolutionary. This volume is edited by Ron Broglio, with an introduction by Robert Mitchell and Ron Broglio, and essays by Robert Mitchell, Ron Broglio, David Baulch, and David Collings.
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December 2007

New Letters from Charles Brown to Joseph Severn

by Brown, Charles Armitage

A collection of 46 letters published in full for the first time, shedding new light on the life and character of Charles Brown and the most important friendship in the Keats Circle, as well as Keats’s complex legacy to his friends.

August 2007

The Brides' Tragedy

by Beddoes, Thomas Lovell

This edition presents both the full text and relevant contexts of the play, including a comprehensive introduction and extensive notes by the editor, two of the sources of the play, and four contemporary reviews.
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William Taylor of Norwich: A Study of the Influence of Modern German Literature in England (1897)

by Herzfeld, Georg

This is a critical biography of William Taylor of Norwich (1765-1836), translated from the German of Georg Herzfeld (1897), with additional introduction and notes. Translated by Astrid Wind, edited with an introduction by David Chandler.
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July 2007

Wordsworth's Dramatic Antipicturesque: Burke, Gilpin, and "Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree"

by Viscomi, Joseph

In this essay, Joseph Viscomi reads William Wordsworth's "Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree" and its revisions as part of an antipicturesque discourse critical of William Gilpin's and Edmund Burke's theories of nature.
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March 2007

The Wordsworth Circle, Special Issue in Honor of Karl Kroeber
This special edition of The Wordsworth Circle, published in honor of  Karl Kroeber, is available courtesy of Romantic Circles in a PDF format.  Edited by Toby Benis, this issue includes articles by Carl Woodring, Martin Meisel, David Simpson, Gillen D'Arcy Wood, James McKusick, Joseph Viscomi, Regina Hewitt, William Deresiewicz, Mark Jones, Steven E. Jones, Marilyn Gaull, and Ursula K. Le Guin.
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February 2007

Romanticism and Buddhism
This volume explores intersections between Western thinking and Eastern religion. Each essay re-examines Romantic-era work in light of the "guides and basic principles" of Buddhist thought. Edited and introduction by Mark Lussier, essays by Louise Economides, Timothy Morton, John Rudy, Dennis McCort, and a poem by Norman Dubie.
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January 2007

Romantic Gastronomies
This volume suggests the myriad ways in which the surprisingly neglected (and critically undigested) Romantic culture of gastronomy influenced artistic production of nineteenth-century Britain and France-at the same time as it raised new philosophical challenges. Edited and introduction by Denise Gigante, this volume includes essays by Carolyn Korsmeyer, Joshua Wilner, and Michael Garval.
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November 2006

Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism
The essays in this volume move beyond the notation of literary influence or ideological parallelism to perform a functional taxonomy of transatlantic Romanticism, helping to explain why the movement developed at different times and rates in different places around the Atlantic. Edited by Lance Newman, Joel Pace and Chris Koenig-Woodyard, this volume includes essays by Joselyn Almeida, Jen Camden, Andre Cardoso, James Crane, Sarah Ferguson-Wagstaffe, Scott Harshbarger, Rebecca Cole Heinowitz, Sohui Lee, and Cree LeFavour.

October 2006

The Temple of Nature 1802

by Darwin, Erasmus

The first fully annotated edition of Erasmus Darwin's influential scientific poem and its copious original notes; including the first publication, from draft, of Darwin's hitherto unknown poetic history of technology, The Progress of Society.
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September 2006

Quarterly Review Electronic Texts
Digitized version of the Quarterly Review, beginning with volume one (1809), including all articles, paratextual materials, and an introduction by the editor.
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July 2006

Geoffrey Hartman and Harold Bloom: Two Interviews
This volume includes a pair of wide-ranging conversations, one between Geoffrey Hartman and Marc Redfield and the other between Harold Bloom and Laura Quinney. While differing in tone, setting, and topics, both conversations reaffirm the centrality of Hartman and Bloom in any history of the study of Romanticism for the last half century. Edited by Orrin Wang.
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May 2006

Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric
The current cretinization of public, political language is often viewed as synonomous with the discourse of patriotism. This volume begins to demonstrate how complex the vocabulary of patriotism actually is, by investigating its diverse use during the Romantic period. Edited by Orrin Wang, essays by Francesco Crocco, Matthew Borushko, Daniel O'Quinn, Andrew Lincoln, Noah Heringman, and Jan Mieszkowski.
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January 2006

Fictions of Byron: An Annotated Bibliography
This annotated bibliography compiled by G. Todd Davis summarizes numerous works of the 19th and 20th centuries that incorporate Lord Byron as a major or a minor character. Using historical and intertextual perspectives, this bibliography embodies Byronism, defined here as the production and reproduction of the Byron legend.
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Shelley Sites/Sights
Take a pictoral journey through the life of Percy Shelley, from his birth at Field Place in Sussex, to his final resting place at the Protestant Cemetery in Rome. In between, visit sites important to Shelley in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and the Continent, particularly Italy. Pictures and text by Darby Lewes and Bob Stiklus.

January 2006

Historicizing Romantic Sexuality
This volume looks at the protean constructions of sexuality in the Romantic period and in current Romanticist scholarship. Edited, introduced by Richard C. Sha, essays by Richard C. Sha, David M. Halperin, Jonathan Loesberg, Elizabeth Fay, Jillian Heydt-Stevenson, Susan S. Lanser, Bradford K. Mudge, Daniel O'Quinn and Andrew Elfenbein.
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December 2005

Gothic Technologies: Visuality in the Romantic Era
The essays in this volume explore the relationship between Romantic Gothicism and the rise of the visual technologies centred on commercial exploitation of the magic lantern. Edited and introduced by Robert Miles , with essays by Fred Botting, Diane Long Hoeveler, Sophie Thomas, Dale Townshend, and Angela Wright.
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May 2005

Legacies of Paul de Man
The essays in this volume evaluate the legacies of Paul de Man, who continues symbolically to embody an aspect of "theory" that resists easy routinization. Edited by Marc Redfield, with essays by Ian Balfour, Cynthia Chase, Sara Guyer, Jan Mieszkowski, Arkady Plotnitsky, Marc Redfield, Rei Terada, and Andrzej Warminski.
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Romanticism and Opera
This collection of essays considers the importance of opera as both an essential ritual of court culture and an innovative art form with a considerable impact on period literature. Edited by Gillen D'Arcy Wood, with essays by Christina Fuhrmann, Diane Long Hoeveler, J. Jennifer Jones , Jessica K. Quillin, and Anne Williams.

March 2005

An Electronic Concordance to Keats' Poetry

by Keats, John

A searchable concordance based on Jack Stillinger's The Poems of John Keats.
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February 2005

Romanticism and the Insistence of the Aesthetic
This volume addresses the question of "Romanticism and the Insistence of the Aesthetic" by considering Romantic versions of the relationship between the aesthetic and power, whether as a form of violence or a force of possibility. Edited by Forest Pyle, with essays by Ian Balfour, David Ferris, Karen Swann and a response by Marc Redfield.
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February 2005

The Quarterly Review Archive
The Quarterly Review Archive supplies original attributions of articles published in the Quarterly during William Gifford's tenure (1809-25). The site also includes extensive notes on each of the articles, annotated transcriptions of letters by William Gifford and John Murray, information about sales and publication dates, a chronology of the founding of the journal and a bibliography of contemporary responses to the Quarterly's articles.
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January 2005

Wondrous Tale of Alroy

by Disraeli, Benjamin

This early novel, first published in 1833, represents Disraeli in "romantic mode." This version features the novel, an introduction, annotations, reprints of Disraeli's sources, contemporary reviews, & modern criticism, as well as a detailed bibliography of Disraeli's life and works, criticism, & other contextual materials.
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January 2005

Digital Designs on Blake
This volume brings together recent and more seasoned Blake scholars to explore how new media provides another mode of inquiry into Blake's complex verbal and visual texts. Edited by Ron Broglio, with essays by David M. Baulch, Marcel O'Gorman, Nelson Hilton, Joseph Byrne, Adam Komisaruk, Steven Guynup, and Fred Yee.
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September 2004

British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism
1792 to 1814

by Bennett, Betty T.

An electronic edition of Bennett's collection of 350 poems highlighting the complex attitudes to the wars of the period. Includes Bennett's original introduction & a new bibliography of poems not included in the original edition.
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August 2004

Wat Tyler 1816, 1834, 1849, 1859

by Southey, Robert

An electronic edition of Robert Southey's poem based on the peasants' rebellion of 1381. This edition provides contextual background on the poem's embattled publication and partisan reception.
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February 2004

Romantic Libraries
A look at book-culture and bibliomania in early 19th-century England, as seen through emerging genres such as the familiar essay, and the formation of private libraries as personal sites of collection and memory. Edited by Ina Ferris, with essays by H. J. Jackson, Ina Ferris and Deidre Lynch.
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January 2004

The Sceptic; A Poem: A Hemans-Byron Dialogue

by Hemans, Felicia Dorothea Browne

This edition places Hemans in direct contention with Byron over belief in an afterlife. Includes letters, reviews, poems & critical essays that probe the work for its engagements with Byron, allusions to topics of the day, & negotiation of gender.

November 2003

The Oceanides
1831 to 1832

by Jewsbury, Maria Jane

This edition situates the poem sequence within Jewsbury's life and career, including a prose account of her journey to India, memoirs, & poems inspired by her work. Allows readers to view original poems as they first appeared in The Athenaeum.
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October 2003

August 2003

Lyrical Ballads 1797, 1799, 1801, 1804

by Wordsworth, William, Coleridge, Samuel Taylor

This electronic edition makes available all 4 versions of Lyrical Ballads in the form of transcriptions edited from original printed copies, accompanied by images of each page. Enables active comparison of texts through Dynamic Collation.

July 2003

Romanticism and Contemporary Poetry and Poetics
Looks at the influence of Romanticism on poets writing today, presenting three divergent analyses of five contemporary poets. Includes contributions from both Romanticists and critics of modern (and postmodern) poetry. Edited by Lisa M. Steinman, with essays by Charles Altieri, Robert Kaufman, and Ellen Keck Stauder.
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June 2003

Frankenstein's Dream
Essays focusing in on two pivotal dreams of Mary Shelley's protagonist, Victor Frankenstein, in her novel Frankenstein, offering various interpretations, found in the book and its many adaptations, including film. Edited by Jerrold E. Hogle, with essays by Anne Williams, Matthew VanWinkle, John Rieder and Marc Redfield.
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May 2003

"Wanderings of Cain" 1827, 1833

by Coleridge, Samuel Taylor

Publishes, for the first time, all the fragments of this unfinished poem in one edition. Includes a composite reading text, piecing together all the fragments, & a parallel reading text of both Canto II and verse fragment.
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January 2003

Once, Only Imagined
An electronic version of an interview with Morris Eaves, Robert Essick, and Joseph Viscomi, editors of The Blake Archive, on the 10th anniversary of its founding. With topics of conversation running the gamut from the winsome (Blake kitsch) to the peculiar (hypothetical extensions of Blake's canon). Edited by Kari Kraus.
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September 2002

Sporting Sketches during a Short Stay in Hindustane 1814

by Williams, Edward Ellerker

Includes MS Shelley adds.e.21 and MS Shelley adds.c.12, together comprising Williams's complete travel journal to India, here published in its entirety for the first time. Also included is a critical introduction.
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August 2002

Fictional Representations of Romantics & Romanticism

A hypertextual list of novels, short stories, plays, films, and other fictional representations of historical Romantic figures, this resource began with a query to NASSR-L about the Romantics in science fiction; it includes a hyperlinked and annotated bibliography.

August 2002

Obi
A volume devoted to the Romantic-era play Obi; or, Three-Finger'd Jack, about escaped slave/rebel Jack Mansong. Includes text of both pantomime and melodrama, and video from a modern production. Edited by Charles Rzepka, with essays by Peter Buckley, Jeffrey N. Cox, Jerrold E. Hogle, Robert Hoskins, Debbie Lee, and Charles Rzepka.
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June 2002

Finding Romantic Commonplaces: A Dialogue with Jerome Christensen
An interview with noted Romanticist Jerome Christensen, presented in the form of a multi-linked site organized around a constellation of "common topics" found in Christensen's work. Offers a revised transcript, and audio files. Edited by Steven Newman.
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February 2002

Romanticism & Contemporary Culture
Essays that examine teaching Romanticism in the context of popular culture, and a debate entitled "Presentism versus Archivalism." Edited by Laura Mandell and Michael Eberle-Sinatra, essays by Phillip Barrish, Ron Broglio, Jay Clayton, Jon Klancher, Jerome McGann, David Simpson, Atara Stein, Gregory Tomso, Ted Underwood.

November 2001

Romanticism and Ecology
A look at the role of the natural world in the works of Romantic writers in the wake of the French Revolution, positing the proto-ecological argument that all living beings are full participants in the progress of liberty. Edited by James McKusick, essays by Kurt Fosso, Timothy Fulford, Kevin Hutchings, Timothy Morton, Ashton Nichols, and William Stroup.
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August 2001

Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein 1823

by Peake, Richard Brinsley

Includes an introduction, full text of the play, images of the 1823 cast, a bibliography and filmography, the first reviews of Presumption, & a biography of Richard Brinsley Peake.
Wordsworth's Route Over the Simplon in 1790
In August 2001, Roger Meyenberg and Patrick Vincent hiked Wordsworth's route over the Simplon Pass, as described in Book VI of The Prelude. Their goal was to establish, of several reconstructed versions of the hike, which route Wordsworth and Robert Jones most likely followed. Includes their narrative and photographs of the pass today.

May 2001

Reading Shelley's Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820
A reading of Shelley's interventionist poetry of 1819-20-including his satires The Mask of Anarchy and Swellfoot the Tyrant-as provocations, dialectical interventions, and pretexts for speculation. Edited by Michael Scrivener, with essays by Samuel Gladden, Robert Kaufman, and Mark Kipperman, with responses by Steven E. Jones.
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March 2001

Romanticism and Complexity
An investigation into the scientific thought of Romantic writers, looking at the Romantics' conflicted attitudes toward Enlightenment-based science, and offering speculative explorations of their work in the framework of more recent scientific developments. Edited by Hugh Roberts, essays by Arkady Plotnitsky and R. Paul Yoder.
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November 2000

The Byron Chronology
The Byron Chronology is a searchable hypertext chronology of important dates in the life of George Gordon, Lord Byron. It draws almost exclusively from Leslie Marchand's standard three-volume biography of Byron's life, with some additions from the material in Marchand's edition of Byron's Letters and Journals.
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November 2000

The Containment and Re-deployment of English India
Essays devoted to English India as it appears in Romantic studies, and the institutional effects of colonial discourse. Edited by Daniel J. O'Quinn, essays by Siraj Ahmed, L. M. Findlay, Daniel J. O'Quinn, Rita Raley, Susan B. Taylor, and Kate Teltscher.

April 2000

Poems 1772

by Barbauld, Anna Laetitia

Includes transcriptions, photo reproductions of the original volume, critical apparatus, & a "Poem Web," featuring detailed commentary & contextual materials for "On a Lady's Writing."

April 2000

Re-reading Box Hill: Reading the Practice of Reading Everyday Life
Readings of Jane Austen and Romanticism, and their influence on each other. Edited by William Galperin, essays by George Levine, Michael Gamer, Deidre Lynch, Susan J. Wolfson, Adam Potkay, and William Walling.
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January 2000

Schelling and Romanticism
An examination of the works of Friedrich Schelling, one of the three major figures in the philosophical and aesthetic history of the Romantic period, and important influence on Coleridge. This volume looks particularly at Schelling's writings on freedom. Edited by David S. Ferris, essays by Jan Mieszkowski, David S. Ferris, and David L. Clark.
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November 1999

The 'Honourable Characteristic of Poetry': Two Hundred Years of Lyrical Ballads
A retrospective volume looking at how the poems of the Lyrical Ballads continue to be important and relevant, especially with respect to American writers and readers. Edited by Marcy L. Tanter, essays by Joel Pace, Charles Rzepka, and Elizabeth Fay.
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August 1999

Romanticism and Philosophy in an Historical Age
A debate on the question of aesthetics and the uses of pleasure in Romanticism, looking at the role of affective experience in aesthetic judgment and the production of meaning, as played out in the interior and social worlds. Edited by Karen Weisman, with essays and responses by Theresa Kelley and Thomas Pfau.
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Irony and Clerisy
Both "irony" and "clerisy" emerge into peculiar discursive prominence during the Romantic era. This volume shows how these two seemingly heterogeneous strands of Romantic discourse come to be linked, and play upon each other. Edited by Deborah Elise White, with essays by Adam Carter, Charles Mahoney, Linda Brigham, and Forest Pyle.

February 1999

Romanticism and the Law
A study of Romantic legal discourse-especially the evolving concepts of intellectual property, blasphemy, sedition, and treason-as a history of textual hermeneutics, a trajectory of misinterpretation and reinterpretation. Edited by Michael Macovski, with essays by Margaret Russett, Susan Eilenberg, Michael Scrivener, and Kathryn Temple.
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December 1998

Conference Archive
An archive of program copy from conferences and sessions of special interest to Romanticists. It includes a complete record of NASSR and ACR conference programs, as well as those of the Wordsworth-Coleridge Assocation, the Keats-Shelley Association, and the Byron Society, and the Romantics section of the MLA.

November 1998

A John Keats Letter Rediscovered

by Keats, John

Includes introduction, diplomatic transcription, & notes.
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October 1998

"Verses" and The Keepsake for 1829 1828

by Landon, Letitia Elizabeth

Includes introduction, diplomatic transcriptions, facsimile pages, biography, bibliography, & commentary.

May 1998

Letter to the Women of England 1798

by Robinson, Mary Darby

Includes introduction, transcriptions, reviews, letters to and from Robinson, selected poems, bibliography, & notes.

April 1998

Romantic Passions
Looks at Romantic women writers' attitudes towards love, particularly as impacted by gender and tradition-inscribed relations, countering the transcendence of love implicit in theories of the sublime. Edited by Elizabeth Fay, essays by Adela Pinch, Jeffrey Robinson, Charles Rzepka, Andrew M. Stauffer, & Nanora Sweet.
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March 1998

The Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Chronology & Resource Site

by Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary

This resource provides a detailed chronology of Mary Shelley's life and work, as well as several contemporary reviews of her novels and of a play inspired by Frankenstein.

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Shelley's Notebooks in the Bodleian Library
This resource presents a detailed index of Shelley's notebooks in the Bodleian, Huntington, C. H. Pforzheimer, British, and Pierpont Morgan Libraries. This index was created from a revised version of Tatsuo Tokoo's article originally published in _Humanities: Bulletin of the Faculty of Letters, Kyoto Prefectural University_ [ISSN 0075-7381], No. 36 (December 1984), pp. 1-32.
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The Political House that Jack Built 1819

by Hone, William, Cruikshank, George

Includes diplomatic transcription of the title page and Hone's verse text, as well as the poem "The Clerical Magistrate". Also offers original illustrations by George Cruikshank, a William Hone chronology, & annotated bibliography.
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October 1997

The Last Man 1825

by Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary

Includes HTML, ASCII, and SGML versions, other works by Mary Shelley, works and excerpts from works cited by Shelley, bibliography, maps, images & sound files, critical essays, contemporary works on plague, notes.
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September 1997

"The Mortal Immortal" 1832

by Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary

Includes HTML and ASCII versions, related contemporary literary works, critical bibliography, print history, images, writings on the text, & notes.
The Devil's Walk

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe

Includes HTML formatted texts, editors' introduction, critically edited text, diplomatic transcription, photofacsimile, & clear reading texts. Also includes collations, bibliography, and notes.

August 1997

Early Shelley: Vulgarisms, Politics, and Fractals
Re-assesses Shelley's early verse, showing that, far from being mere juvenilia, it offers an aesthetics of excess and a politics of resistance that provides access to the early Regency culture, as well as to Shelley's art and thought in general. Edited by Neil Fraistat, with essays by Linda Brigham, William Keach, Timothy Morton, and Donald H. Reiman.
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The Last Formalist, or W.J.T. Mitchell as Romantic Dinosaur
An interview of W. J. T. Mitchell with Orrin N. C. Wang. Includes Mitchell's unconventional answers/narrative—his "Romantic Education"—as well as an equally unconventional gloss by Wang, entitled "The Sorrows of Young Wieboldt."
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July 1997

Romanticism and Conspiracy
Focuses on the conspiracy narratives prevalent in England in the 1790s, centered on the English Jacobins and their opponents, and carried forth into the discourse of the second generation of Romanticism. Edited by Orrin N. C. Wang, with essays by Kevin Gilmartin, Charles Mahoney, Thomas Pfau, and Kim Wheatley.
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February 1997

On The Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci in the Florentine Gallery

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe

Includes dialogic commentary; critical essays by Jerome J. McGann, W.J.T. Mitchell, and Grant F. Scott; images; bibliography; & notes.
The Percy Bysshe Shelley Chronology

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe

An annotated hypertext timeline of important dates in the life and work of Percy Bysshe Shelley, this chronology is designed to function both as a stand-alone resource and in conjunction with The Romantic Chronology at UC Santa Barbara.
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