Novel Prospects: Teaching Romantic-Era Fiction

English 4990: Religious Enthusiasm and Toleration in Romantic-Era Fiction

Date published: 

August, 2008
Syllabus

English 4990: Religious Enthusiasm and Toleration in Romantic-Era Fiction

Daniel Schierenbeck, University of Central Missouri


Required Texts and Materials

Hamilton, Elizabeth. Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah. Ed. Pamela Perkins and Shannon Russell. Peterborough, ON: Broadview, 1999.

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Race in Romantic Reformist Fiction: A Course Syllabus

Date published: 

August, 2008

Race in Romantic Reformist Fiction: A Course Syllabus

A. A. Markley, Penn State University Brandywine


Week 1: The Story of Oroonoko

Aphra Behn, Oroonoko; or, The Royal Slave (1688)

selections from Thomas Southerne's Oroonoko (1695)

Week 2: Slavery, the Slave Trade, and the Abolition Movement

Selections from the Mansfield Judgment, Cugoano, Wilberforce, Clarkson, et al.

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Race in Romantic Reformist Fiction: A Checklist

Date published: 

August, 2008

Race in Romantic Reformist Fiction: A Checklist

A. A. Markley, Penn State University Brandywine


The African and the Creole

Life in the West Indies:

Anonymous, The Excursion of Osman (1792)

Robert Bage, Man As He Is (1792)

Anna Maria Mackenzie, Slavery: or, the Times (1792)

Anonymous, Henry Willoughby (1798)

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Novel Prospects: Teaching Romantic-Era Fiction

Date published: 

August, 2008
This collection explores the challenges of teaching narrative fiction published between 1789 and 1830. These essays engage with the ways in which Romantic-era fiction challenges not just period conventions, but pedagogical practices and undergraduate scholarship. Topics examined include issues raised by teaching "historical" novels to modern students, reading Jane Austen in a time of war, depictions of racialized bodies in reformist fictions, and situating Romantic fictions in place and social contexts. Emphasizing new possibilities for classroom teaching and demonstrating that scholarly pursuits and teaching need not exist in separate spheres, the essays also offer practical approaches to "folding" Romantic-era fiction into existing course projects at the same time that they examine the questions raised by including texts and writers that, until recently, have been largely ignored.

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