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Stephen C. Behrendt is George Holmes Distinguished University Professor of English at the University of Nebraska. He has published widely on the Shelleys and on Blake, in addition to authoring numerous studies of relations among the arts. Recent books include Shellley and His Audiences (1989), Approaches to Teaching Shelley's 'Frankenstein' (1990), Reading William Blake (1992), and Royal Mourning and Regency Culture: Elegies and Memorials of Princess Charlotte (1997). His poetry has also been published widely and includes two books: Instruments of the Bones (1992) and A Step in the Dark (1996). His major current research centers on British women poets of the Romantic period; among projects in this area he is presently co-editing an electronic archive of Scottish women poets of the Romantic period (forthcoming, Alexander Street Press).

Moore, Thomas (1779–1852): Irish poet whose performances as a singer and declaimer, not least of his own Irish Melodies (1808–34), won him fashionable success in London. The Oriental verse romance Lalla Rookh, for which Moore received an advance of £3000, appeared in 1817.

From the Correspondent List of the Bloomfield Letters Edition

Moore, Thomas (1779–1852): Irish poet whose performances as a singer and declaimer, not least of his own Irish Melodies (1808–34), won him fashionable success in London. The Oriental verse romance Lalla Rookh, for which Moore received an advance of £3000, appeared in 1817.

From the Correspondent List of the Bloomfield Letters Edition

William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads.

Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which he revised and expanded a number of times. It was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as the poem "to Coleridge". Wordsworth was Britain's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850. --from Wikipedia

William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads.

Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which he revised and expanded a number of times. It was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as the poem "to Coleridge". Wordsworth was Britain's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850. --from Wikipedia

Letitia Elizabeth Landon (14 August 1802 – 15 October 1838), English poet and novelist, better known by her initials L. E. L. --from Wikipedia

Letitia Elizabeth Landon (14 August 1802 – 15 October 1838), English poet and novelist, better known by her initials L. E. L. --from Wikipedia

Kyle Grimes is Associate Professor of English at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His scholarly work is centered in British Romantic writing, with particular emphases in Blake, Shelley, Byron, and the lesser-known parodist, publisher, and antiquarian William Hone. He has published articles and reviews in such journals as the Keats-Shelley Journal, Studies in Romanticism, JEGP, and others. His work also appears in several edited collections. More recently, Grimes has turned his attention to electronic publications such as the William Hone BioText and the Romanticism@UAB pedagogical blog. In addition, Grimes has served as bibliographer to the Keats-Shelley Association of America (2000-04) and currently serves as the Romanticism Section editor for the Annotated Bibliography of English Studies published online by Routledge. Grimes teaches courses in British Romanticism, Bibliography, Poetics, Research Methods, Poetics, etc.

Kyle Grimes is Associate Professor of English at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His scholarly work is centered in British Romantic writing, with particular emphases in Blake, Shelley, Byron, and the lesser-known parodist, publisher, and antiquarian William Hone. He has published articles and reviews in such journals as the Keats-Shelley Journal, Studies in Romanticism, JEGP, and others. His work also appears in several edited collections. More recently, Grimes has turned his attention to electronic publications such as the William Hone BioText and the Romanticism@UAB pedagogical blog. In addition, Grimes has served as bibliographer to the Keats-Shelley Association of America (2000-04) and currently serves as the Romanticism Section editor for the Annotated Bibliography of English Studies published online by Routledge. Grimes teaches courses in British Romanticism, Bibliography, Poetics, Research Methods, Poetics, etc.

George Cruikshank (27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878) was a British caricaturist and book illustrator, praised as the "modern Hogarth" during his life. His book illustrations for his friend Charles Dickens, and many other authors, reached an international audience. -- from Wikipedia

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