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Kyle Grimes is Associate Professor of English at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His scholarly work is centered in British Romantic writing, with particular emphases in Blake, Shelley, Byron, and the lesser-known parodist, publisher, and antiquarian William Hone. He has published articles and reviews in such journals as the Keats-Shelley Journal, Studies in Romanticism, JEGP, and others. His work also appears in several edited collections. More recently, Grimes has turned his attention to electronic publications such as the William Hone BioText and the Romanticism@UAB pedagogical blog. In addition, Grimes has served as bibliographer to the Keats-Shelley Association of America (2000-04) and currently serves as the Romanticism Section editor for the Annotated Bibliography of English Studies published online by Routledge. Grimes teaches courses in British Romanticism, Bibliography, Poetics, Research Methods, Poetics, etc.

Kyle Grimes is Associate Professor of English at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His scholarly work is centered in British Romantic writing, with particular emphases in Blake, Shelley, Byron, and the lesser-known parodist, publisher, and antiquarian William Hone. He has published articles and reviews in such journals as the Keats-Shelley Journal, Studies in Romanticism, JEGP, and others. His work also appears in several edited collections. More recently, Grimes has turned his attention to electronic publications such as the William Hone BioText and the Romanticism@UAB pedagogical blog. In addition, Grimes has served as bibliographer to the Keats-Shelley Association of America (2000-04) and currently serves as the Romanticism Section editor for the Annotated Bibliography of English Studies published online by Routledge. Grimes teaches courses in British Romanticism, Bibliography, Poetics, Research Methods, Poetics, etc.

Kyle Grimes is Associate Professor of English at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His scholarly work is centered in British Romantic writing, with particular emphases in Blake, Shelley, Byron, and the lesser-known parodist, publisher, and antiquarian William Hone. He has published articles and reviews in such journals as the Keats-Shelley Journal, Studies in Romanticism, JEGP, and others. His work also appears in several edited collections. More recently, Grimes has turned his attention to electronic publications such as the William Hone BioText and the Romanticism@UAB pedagogical blog. In addition, Grimes has served as bibliographer to the Keats-Shelley Association of America (2000-04) and currently serves as the Romanticism Section editor for the Annotated Bibliography of English Studies published online by Routledge. Grimes teaches courses in British Romanticism, Bibliography, Poetics, Research Methods, Poetics, etc.

George Cruikshank (27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878) was a British caricaturist and book illustrator, praised as the "modern Hogarth" during his life. His book illustrations for his friend Charles Dickens, and many other authors, reached an international audience. -- from Wikipedia

George Cruikshank (27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878) was a British caricaturist and book illustrator, praised as the "modern Hogarth" during his life. His book illustrations for his friend Charles Dickens, and many other authors, reached an international audience. -- from Wikipedia

Tilar J. Mazzeo is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin in Oshkosh. She is the editor of several editions of Romantic-period works, including: Mary Shelley's Lives of the Most Eminent Literary . . . Men of Italy (forthcoming, Pickering and Chatto, 2002), a volume of Middle Eastern travel writing in the series Travels, Exploration, and Empire (Pickering and Chatto, 2001), and an edition of Thomas Medwin's roman a clef account of Claire Clairmont and Romantic manners, Lady Singleton. She is presently completing a book on plagiarism and intellectual property in the Romantic period.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as for his major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. He coined many familiar words and phrases, including the celebrated suspension of disbelief. Coleridge suffered from poor health that may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these concerns with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction. -- from Wikipedia

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as for his major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. He coined many familiar words and phrases, including the celebrated suspension of disbelief. Coleridge suffered from poor health that may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these concerns with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction. -- from Wikipedia

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as for his major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. He coined many familiar words and phrases, including the celebrated suspension of disbelief. Coleridge suffered from poor health that may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these concerns with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction. -- from Wikipedia

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