Abstract

Ferguson, "Educational Rationalization / Sublime Reason"

Educational discussion in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century increasingly focused on actions—what someone could be seen to do—and the values of those actions in a social context. Although Rousseau and Bentham stress the evaluations that the physical world or the social world continually supply a child's actions, Kant extends his view of morality even past their concern with disambiguated, nonformulaic action to argue that the centrality of moral thought is obvious in ordinary conversation—the methodized gossip of what he takes to be moral entertainments. This essay appears in _The Sublime and Education_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

Hamilton, "The Sublime: History of an Education"

The 'sublime', taken as an aesthetic category originating in Kant’s third Kritik, but by no means terminating there, has been read in strikingly symptomatic ways by late 20th-century theory. To review these different interpretations or uses of its antinomial structure is to appreciate the sublime’s continuing life in the ways in which we think the integrity, limitations and motivations of our contemporary intellectual procedures. This paper tries both to show the varieties of this ongoing education, and then to ask questions about the place of the originally aesthetic function of the sublime which these utilitarian expansions of it seem to entail. This essay appears in _The Sublime and Education_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

Balfour, "Afterthoughts on the Sublime and Education; or, 'Teachable Moments?'"

This essay provides a commentary on and critique of the other essays in the volume. It tracks the claims of the several essays with attention to the status of the examples adduced and the give and take between examples and theoretical paradigms. There is also some consideration of the historical continuities and discontinuities of the theory and the productions of the sublime. This essay appears in _The Sublime and Education_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland

Braider, "Unlearning the Sublime"

The essay argues that, if the sublime continues to fascinate scholars and philosophers long after the critical dismantling of its metaphysical underpinnings in Kant, Hegel, and Romanticism, it is because it has found a refuge in the topology of critical thought as such. The solution of the ongoing problem of the sublime accordingly lies in investigating the afterlife this topology grants not only the sublime itself but metaphysics even (if not especially) for writers like Benjamin, Derrida, Agamben, and Zizek committed to the skeptical and/or materialist deconstruction of the transcendental pretensions the sublime keeps alive. This essay appears in _The Sublime and Education_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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