About this Volume

About this Volume

The six essays collected here suggest that Romanticism exposes us to a materialism that cannot merely be overcome and an idealism with which it is not identical. By reading beyond the texts conventionally associated with Romanticism, and by recasting the critical tendencies–from thing theory to object oriented ontology–through the poets, genres, and critics of Romanticism, these essays position Romanticism (and show how Romanticism may always have been positioned) in another relation to things as they are–or may be. Edited and with an introduction by Sara Guyer and Celeste Langan, with essays by Brian McGrath, Sonia Hofkosh, Tom Toremans, Mario Ortiz-Robles, Yoon Sun Lee, & Anna Kornbluh.

About the Design and Markup

This volume was designed at the University of Maryland by Michael Quilligan and Kyle Bickoff, Site Manager at Romantic Circles. The initial transformation from WORD Doc to TEI P5 was made using the OxGarage tool, with further TEI markup modifications according to RC house style applied by Michael Quilligan and Kyle Bickoff. TEI renders text in archival quality for better preservation and future access. Laura Mandell and Dave Rettenmaier developed the modified versions of the XSLT transforms provided by the TEI that were used to convert the TEI files into HTML. The image associated with this volume includes elements from an 1873 reproduction of an 1839 watercolor portrait of William Wordsworth by Margaret Gillies (1803-1887) housed in the Wikimedia Commons. This image comes from the Portrait Gallery of the Perry–Castañeda Library of the University of Texas at Austin. It is in the public domain, and is used courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin.

About the Romantic Circles Praxis Series

The Romantic Circles Praxis Series is devoted to using computer technologies for the contemporary critical investigation of the languages, cultures, histories, and theories of Romanticism. Tracking the circulation of Romanticism within these interrelated domains of knowledge, RCPS recognizes as its conceptual terrain a world where Romanticism has, on the one hand, dissolved as a period and an idea into a plurality of discourses and, on the other, retained a vigorous, recognizable hold on the intellectual and theoretical discussions of today. RCPS is committed to mapping out this terrain with the best and most exciting critical writing of contemporary Romanticist scholarship.

About the Contributors

Sara Guyer is professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she directs the Center for the Humanities. She is the author of Reading with John Clare: Biopoetics, Sovereignty, Romanticism (Fordham, 2015) and Romanticisim After Auschwitz (Stanford, 2007).

Celeste Langan is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Romantic Vagrancy (1995) and essays on Scott, Coleridge, and Byron.

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Brian McGrath is associate professor of English at Clemson University. He is the author of The Poetics of Unremembered Acts: Reading, Lyric, Pedagogy (Northwestern, 2013) and, with Sara Guyer, co-editor of the book series Lit Z (Fordham University Press).

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Sonia Hofkosh is Associate Professor of English at Tufts University. She is the author of Sexual Politics and the Romantic Author (Cambridge, 1998) and co-editor, with Alan Richardson, of Romanticism, Race, and Imperial Culture, 1780-1834 (Indiana, 1996). She has published essays on various topics, including Jane Austen the illusionist, early photography, and Anna Barbauld’s poetics of the everyday, and has been working on a book about the artifactual in Romantic formulations of subjectivity, memory, and the imagination.

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Tom Toremans is Assistant Professor at KU Leuven, Belgium, where he teaches English literature and literary theory. He has held postdoctoral (2007) and nominated (2008) fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities of the University of Edinburgh and is a member of the steering committee of the Centre for Reception Studies (www.receptionstudies.be). He has published on British Romanticism (Coleridge, Wordsworth, Carlyle, Scott, de Quincey), contemporary literature (Alasdair Gray, James Kelman, Alan Warner, David Albahari, J.M. Coetzee), and literary theory (de Man, Derrida). His current research focuses on British Romantic engagements with and theorizations of various forms of translation.

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Mario Ortiz-Robles is Associate Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is the author of The Novel as Event (Michigan, 2010), Literature and Animal Studies (Routledge, forthcoming), and, with Caroline Levine, co-editor of Narrative Middles: Navigating the Victorian Novel (Ohio, 2011).

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Yoon Sun Lee teaches at Wellesley College. She has published books and articles on subjects ranging from British Romanticism to Asian American literature and theories of the everyday. Her current project examines the Romantic novel, with particular attention to Scott and Austen.

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Anna Kornbluh is Associate Professor of English at the University of Illinois, Chicago, where her research and teaching focus on the Victorian novel and critical theory. She is the author of Realizing Capital: Financial and Psychic Economies in Victorian Form and is currently at work on The Order of Forms.

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