About this Volume

About this Volume

Nineteenth-century Anglo-Jewish literature engages a wide range of thematic and aesthetic preoccupations. This volume brings together several essays that highlight such breadth, even as the essays converge upon several questions that recur consistently throughout this literature: what does it mean to advertise one’s subjectivity, especially where the expression of such subjectivity is inflected by aesthetic and formalist concerns that are historically connected to English nationalism? Such questions are especially relevant when considered alongside the historical context: Jews in England did not achieve political emancipation until 1858, and they were widely regarded as racially other for much of the century. Jewish writers do not answer such questions with one voice; however, their political and cultural contexts put pressure on their aesthetic choices, and we explore these choices in the essays that follow.

About the Design and Markup

This volume was designed and encoded at the University of Colorado, Boulder by Cayla Eagon, Site Manager at Romantic Circles. The banner image includes a portrait of "Rosa Matilda" by Adam Buck, from the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; a portrait of Grace Aguilar by J. Cochran, from the Jewish Museum, London; and a portrait of Israel Zangwill by Walter Richard Sickert from the Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art, Edinburgh. The initial transformation from WORD Doc to TEI P5 was made using the OxGarage tool, with further TEI markup modifications according to RC house style. TEI renders text in archival quality for better preservation and future access. Laura Mandell and Dave Rettenmaier developed the modified versions of the XSLT transforms provided by the TEI that were used to convert the TEI files into HTML.

About the Romantic Circles Praxis Series

The Romantic Circles Praxis Series is devoted to using computer technologies for the contemporary critical investigation of the languages, cultures, histories, and theories of Romanticism. Tracking the circulation of Romanticism within these interrelated domains of knowledge, RCPS recognizes as its conceptual terrain a world where Romanticism has, on the one hand, dissolved as a period and an idea into a plurality of discourses and, on the other, retained a vigorous, recognizable hold on the intellectual and theoretical discussions of today. RCPS is committed to mapping out this terrain with the best and most exciting critical writing of contemporary Romanticist scholarship.