Romantic Circles Publications

Romantic Circles Publications displays all the peer-reviewed content published by Romantic Circles.
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March 2020

The essays on Teaching Global Romanticism collected here present varied approaches to teaching Romanticism in a global context through individual assignments, units, and syllabi. The contributors share ways to enrich pedagogical approaches to Romantic literature and culture with texts and ideas from beyond Britain and America. These essays discuss how literature guides students’ engagement with international themes and issues in the Romantic period and after. The initiative for this volume began under the leadership of William Stroup.

February 2020

Newest Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials, and a panel of three to four finalists are selected to discuss their pedagogy during a panel at the annual NASSR conference. Exemplary submissions consider how teaching revivifies Romanticism, in any of its myriad forms.

November 2019

Admired by Wordsworth and Southey, called by Clare 'the greatest Pastoral Poet England ever gave birth too’, Robert Bloomfield was one of the bestselling poets of the nineteenth century. A labouring-class writer famed for his rural verse, Bloomfield was not only a major influence on Clare but also a children’s author, playwright, tourist writer, and literary critic. The Collected Writings of Robert Bloomfield is the first ever scholarly edition of his entire oeuvre. The editors have collated all the lifetime editions of his publications, making it possible as never before to study the range of his work and the many revisions it underwent. The poems’ textual histories are displayed in variants, editorial footnotes and explanatory introductions. The literary and biographical contexts are discussed, as are the works' critical receptions and publication histories. The effect on his publications of Bloomfield’s vexed position, caught between the traditional expectations of a patron and the demands of a commercial bookseller is detailed. As a result, it is now possible to see Bloomfield both as a major nature poet and as a dramatic illustration of the new pressures on the author caused by the expansion of print culture in the Romantic era. The Collected Writings takes its place alongside the other Bloomfield resources on Romantic Circles—the Electronic Editions of his Letters and of his poem/tour journal/sketchbook The Banks of Wye—and the essay collection ‘The inestimable blessing of letters’.

October 2019

This volume attests to the continuing relevance of Mary Wollstonecraft to twenty-first century feminist thought. Making connections between Wollstonecraft's efforts to think within and beyond Enlightenment principles of liberal humanism and various significant issues and debates in contemporary culture from the impacts of social media to the impasses in theories (and practices) of social justice, the essays collectively address questions about what counts as feminism(s) now. Mary Wollstonecraft Even Now explores the range of concerns its contributors take up in considering the feminist afterlives of Wollstonecraft’s controversial writings and ideas.
Ever since Paul de Man’s "Shelley Disfigured," we have come to see Percy Shelley’s final, unfinished poem, The Triumph of Life, as a symptom of the end of Romanticism and Romanticism as end. If or once things are over, why bother to re-visit the end? This is one of many questions Shelley’s poem compels its readers to ask, which is in turn to ask why we any longer need to re-visit the poem at this a time when so little apparently rests on our doing so. So, as if to prolong the idea of an end (whatever that might be), this volume is comprised of four essays compelled to return to the same poem, as if to read the poem as a crime scene that leaves a barrage of clues, none of them adding up to a crime, but each lingering differently with Shelley as Shelley lingers with life and history and as we linger (or not) with the shadows his future casts (or not) upon our present moment, which seems more than ever beyond our grasp, if it ever was within our ken. Why even bother? But then again, and just in case: if so little and so much is at stake, why not?

June 2019

In commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Manfred: A Dramatic Poem (1817) and based on original talks given at an international symposium at New York University on April 21, 2017, this special Romantic Circles Praxis volume offers not only a collection of essays that reassesses Lord Byron’s drama from an array of angles but also recent artistic adaptations of the script and an audio recording of a reenacted musical scene from the 1834 London production of Manfred. Among the subjects addressed in these essays are the play’s dramaturgical and staging potential, the curious history of its publication, circulation, and reception, and the authorial intent of a work based on Byron’s scandalous life. The readings also revisit the complexities behind Manfred’s hybrid genre, while expanding the range of cultural influences and source materials that have previously been associated with the play. With Manfred Byron created a work that fused his own celebrity myth with elements from various cultures, faiths, myths, epochs, genres, and traditions. Byron fired the public imagination with a drama that, in pushing well beyond its rootedness in a Swiss landscape and in his own biography, transcends the limits of the personal and the local as an eccentric and eclectic work of global horizons.

December 2018

This edition showcases the poetry of Thomas D’Arcy Morris (1792-1835), a significant figure in the Bombay literary scene of the early nineteenth century. It identifies and attributes Morris’s works, originally published anonymously or pseudonymously in contemporary newspapers and periodicals. The central text is the long review / poem The Griffin, accompanied by some related earlier works by Morris, and some contextual correspondence. The edition also includes a list of later anonymous and pseudonymous works by Morris from the Oriental Sporting Magazine (1828-1833).

July 2018

By the time that Samuel Glover published A Description of the Valley of Chamouni, in Savoy in 1819, Mont Blanc was well established as a place of great scientific importance and as a key attraction for tourists and travellers seeking the mountain sublime. This edition re-situates Glover’s Description in the context of eighteenth-century and romantic-period writing about Chamonix-Mont Blanc and details its connections to Jean-Baptiste Troye’s popular exhibition of relief models of the area and the controversy surrounding the inscriptions left in the registers of various hotels and tourist sites around Chamonix by Percy Bysshe Shelley in July 1816. It also attempts to solve what is now the mystery of who Samuel Glover might have been: hardly any information about him survives, and what few details are available are all connected with Description.

May 2018

The British author Charlotte Turner Smith (1749-1806), best known for her acclaimed and innovative Elegiac Sonnets (1784), has a life story as interesting and difficult as her literature was admired and influential. This StoryMap, by Elizabeth A. Dolan and Gillian Andrews, demonstrates the way in which Smith's residential (in)security was related to her dependence on her father and husband, a situation common to eighteenth-century women. The Charlotte Smith Story Map is the first piece of scholarship to integrate information from all the known letters that Smith wrote; those included in Judith Stanton's 2003 Collected Letters of Charlotte Smith, and also all the letters discovered in the last 15 years.

May 2018

This volume presents new work by scholars working at the intersection of British Romanticism and affect studies. Each essay takes a different approach to affect and emotion, from a piece on Joanna Baillie’s passion plays, co-written by a literary scholar and a cognitive psychologist, to a piece that utilizes affect theory and rhythmic studies in a reading of William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. This volume does not propose a single definition of “affect,” but all of the essays share the conviction that the kind of interdisciplinary work demanded by affect studies is beneficial to both Romantic studies and affect studies. Much more than a passing trend, affect studies has transformed the study of emotion for a generation of scholars.

November 2017

This collection came together as the result of the annual Romantic Circles-NASSR (North American Society for the Study of Romanticism) Pedagogy Prize. Lindsey Eckert and Lissette Lopez Szwydky, co-winners of the 2014 prize, separately submitted projects that included technology as central components of their courses. Together, the six essays in this volume speak to the value of collaboration, interdisciplinary teaching, and public humanities. Underscoring all of the contributions is a belief that Romantic literature is uniquely suited to innovate pedagogical approaches that embrace new technologies because the historical period itself was characterized by questions about technology, its consequences, and its possibilities. As scholars and educators of Romanticism, we see strong parallels between the period that we teach and the age in which we live. Using multimedia projects, the essays in this collection approach themes central to Romanticism—nature, rights, collaboration, reading, the public sphere—through the Industrial Revolution at the turn of the nineteenth century and the digital revolution at the turn of the twenty-first century. This volume provides practical overviews of technical and digital alternative assignments that can be incorporated into Romantic-period courses, including critical reflection about the value of digital projects in the humanities.

July 2017

Pedagogies Hangouts is a multimedia series that brings together scholars and teachers of Romanticism at all levels to talk about the possibilities and challenges of teaching in the twenty-first century.

June 2017

This collection thinks the “rights” of the negative against the more common association of the term “rights” with human rights and rights that can be posited. Such rights, despite their seeming liberalism, produce a normative notion of the person which is in the end biopolitical, and moreover, in assuming that rights can always be posited, they assume the primacy of the public sphere. The essays in this collection all resist the current emphasis on the public sphere that has resulted from the absorption of “Romanticism” into the “Nineteenth Century,” and focus instead on Romanticism as a retreat from publication, publicity and consensus. Whether this retreat is absolute negation or a withdrawal that holds something in reserve is a question left open in the spaces between these six essays on Godwin, Charlotte Smith, Coleridge and Goya.

June 2017

This electronic edition makes available the works of the mostly unknown late-eighteenth-century poet and teacher Catherine Upton, including The Siege of Gibraltar (1781), an epistolary prose narrative, and Miscellaneous Pieces (1784), a collection of poetry and prose. These two works appear to represent the whole of Upton’s small oeuvre, and they contribute to both the body of Romantic-era women’s poetry and, more specifically, to the body of women’s writing about war.

May 2017

This collection grows out of a 2014 conference panel at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), in which five of our six authors shared their varied experiences leading study-abroad courses and field schools to various parts of England and France. These experiences ranged from do-it-yourself plans to full partnerships with third-party organizers, with a similar range of flexibility and cost. Taken together, five areas shape the concerns of the five chapters: models of study and the logistics of running them; models of leadership; types of assignments and excursions; forms of collaborative teaching and learning; and the value of international education for humanities-based learning. This volume will provide practical and experience-based information about study-abroad programs as well as critical reflection about methods and motives.

April 2017

This special issue explores the notion that many of the forms, ideas, and practices inaugurated or exemplified in the Romantic period continue to shape and drive our contemporary discourses. Literary critics, cultural and political theorists, and, indeed, our students continue to encounter new permutations—if not the continued presence—of something that might be called the romantic. But how is the (neo-)romantic expressed in contemporary culture? And how might we best prepare students to listen for and hear its repetitions? How might we teach the romantic alongside the contemporary without either reducing one to the other or eliding important historical, cultural, and social contexts? In response to these questions, the nine essays and three interviews that comprise this volume address the repetitions and reverberations of the romantic as it recurs across genre, period, and media boundaries in popular culture, contemporary political situations, changing classroom dynamics, and the constantly shifting domains of literary and pedagogical practice and production.

March 2017

Based on extensive new archival research, The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six: 1819 to 1821 brings together for the first time Southey’s surviving letters from a period of turbulence and transition in his own life and in wider society. The 546 letters published here are testimony to Southey’s formidable energy and commitment to letter writing as a vehicle for social networking and for the exchange of information and opinion. They show his active engagement in cultural and political debate locally, nationally and internationally. They reflect on a vast range of subjects, including domestic and familial relationships, medicine and science, economics, the law, the history, flora and fauna of the Lake District and of Brazil, attempts to improve the lot of distressed gentlewomen, the need to treat men who acted ‘unlawfully (especially in mobs)’ as wild ‘beasts’, European lotteries, and new inventions such as the ‘German Horse’ (a predecessor of the bicycle).

February 2017

Is Romantic prose a neutral instrument of representation? Does it struggle to engage questions of experience and sensation in new ways? How should prose be understood in relation to poetic expressiveness? The essays in this volume explore Romantic prose across multiple genres as a kind of performative utterance that redraws the boundaries between the private and the social.

December 2016

These essays reflect on the ways contributors integrate literary theory into their teaching of Romanticism and reflect on the continued importance of literary theory to Romanticism and the work of Romanticists. Collectively the essays broach a range of questions, but perhaps most importantly: why teach Romanticism and literary theory today? How does teaching Romanticism with literary theory alter our ideas of both?

December 2016

“What’s new with German Romanticism?” – the question gestures to the important contribution of German-language writing to our understanding of the period but also to the trenchant and suggestive interrogation of the category of “newness” by German Romantic writers. The essays in this collection represent some of the most important current trends in scholarship, but each also grapples in some way or another with the challenges that the literary, philosophical, scientific, and legal writings of Romanticism pose to received narratives about history, meaning, and power, including narratives about originality and newness, revolutionary breaks and fresh beginnings.

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